About your Search

20130115
20130123
STATION
CSPAN2 7
CSPAN 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
CNNW 3
SFGTV 3
KQED (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
WETA 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 38
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
march on washington through prominent historian and martin luther king jr.'s papers. >> up next on booktv after words with guest host authors and play right janet langhart cohen. this week is dorian clayborne carson and "martin's dream" my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr.. in it he recalls his journey from teenage civil rights activist to his presence at the 1963 march on -- he includes encounters with the many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> host: dr. carson thanks for joining me on after words. >> guest: it's my pleasure. >> host: your book, "martin's dream" is a memoir and a history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and you are very candid about your life and you also cover new insights as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with m
. i picked up my newspaper and there was martin luther king, the little rock nine, the students and dissidents -- in the sit-ins. i'm in college, i get to go to this student meeting, national student association meeting in indiana -- indianapolis. >> host: which is my home town. >> guest: and i met stokely carmichael. he was the first person sncc. he dismissed that. how could you think about going to that pyknic? >> host: >> guest: he didn't say that in terms of martin luther king. he was one of the people the was going to be at the march. i think that just for me he felt that i should be in georgia and cambridge maryland and he was at the university at the time, said he would be going to these places where his activism instead of going to the march 1 just was not what he had in mind, and i think that he was trying to recruit me into the movement. but for me going for the most exciting and radical thing that i'd done in my life at that point. >> host: let's go back to the march when he gave that address. what did you think of the speech? did you think it would be iconic for the
the memory of dr. martin luther king jr. this weekend, we cap off the 10th anniversary week by revisiting our conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could
>>> book tv continues with mr. kotz on martin luther king, jr.. this is about an hour. [applause] >>> good evening. it's a pleasure to be with you all. just two days shy of martin luther king's birthday, to talk about some things that took place in the 1960's that literally changed the history of this country. i am hoping to call on you all to participate in this talk about not only why those things happen in the 60's, but to talk about where do we go from here in a society that has despite great accomplishment has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a cit
kicks off the second term on martin luther king day. today and inauguration day special. we will air highlights from last ides' peace ball including naacp president benjamin jealous. >> the challenge for our country is never to see the day when a person of color would be president, nor the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to have -- happen again and again. >> we'll also hear from the legendary poet son the sanchez, ralph nader, sweet honey and the rock, and angela davis. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential agenda. >> we will look at big money behind the inauguration. four years ago president obama refused to accept corporate donations, but this year exxonmobil, at&t, christoph are among the biggest backers of today's festivities. -- microsoft are among the biggest backers of today's festivities. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the teenage gunman is in custody after allegedly killing five members of his family in new mexico on saturd
of martin luther king's birthday, to talk about things that took place in9 the 1960s. there's literally changed the history of this country.. i'm h oping to call on you all o participate in this to talk about hy those things happened in the 1960's but to talk about where do we go from here in a society that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a
luther king day, he was one of the people who got the day created in the first place and made martin luther king's birthday a national holiday. i talked to him about that, about the first couple, about gun control, about many things. a fascinating few minutes with a living musical legend. >> stevie wonder, how are you? >> great. how are you? >> is that your british accent? >> i was born in england, actually. i moved to the states like yourself. >> this is a huge night. and for you, i guess, a very special day. you campaigned very hard to have a national holiday on martin luther king day. this is that day, and it's the day that barack obama is inaugurated again. how do you feel today? >> very excited, very, very happy. i feel like there's so many things that i envisioned, that i saw, and those things are happening, coming true. the only thing i'm hoping for is that we truly will get people together. you know, sometimes i wish we could have even more than a democratic party and republican party, a united party. where people come together, but i think that if we just get people thinking
your life and cover new insights as a historian from the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you? >> guest: it is the 50th anniversary and it is 50 years of mine life of the king legacy and to my coming of age. part of it was to do the to tasks. that my life had been connected to the keying legacy -- king legacy and how king impacted me and i was involved with this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> host: it is an excellent reid and we are of the same generation and i was also coming of age. it was bittersweet because i knew dr. king he was my mentor. but bitter because the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred. we can start at the beginning the kids you're on the mall with dr. king and at the end you were there again with 50 years later with the monument you help to design. >> guest: and coming back for important occasions. i only lived in washington a short time but the mall had a great symbolic meaning and sentimental. >> host: it is a beautiful city. 19 years ago, the march on washington where he gave the speech i have a dream. how di
when did you first get to be interested in martin luther king? >> guest: when i was in high school as a young fellow growing up in atlanta georgia my parents didn't have an answer. it became kind of a quest to find out about it in the sense that there was enormous power and that would change the direction of my life. when i wasn't looking for it to happen. c-span: how many of your years did you think about this? >> guest: i started after i got into a book career in the late 70's after magazine journalism. i wanted to write about this period because i hadn't answered the question what is it made of and i thought in 1981 with what was proposed to be a three year history of the teen years and it's now been 16 years and i've done it in two volumes is now projected to be a trilogy or will be a trilogy after i finish it but i would have 20 years. definitely turning into my life work but i'm thankful for the privilege of it. c-span: the first book, parting the waters, 1,056 pages. this but there are 546 pages. what's been your approach? >> guest: to do it in storytelling. one of the reaso
: what would martin luther king jr. be doing if he were alive today? chances are he wouldn't be working for the koch brothers. coming up next. only on current tv. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? the tons of obama merchandise. we have some souvenirs like the john boehner commemorative inaugural republican drinking glass. it's always half empty, never half full, and it's perfect for when you want to cry in your own beer in public. and the rush limbaugh commemorative inaugural bucket of sand. designed to bury your head neck deep so ignore history and facts and it's big enough to hold all your viagra for those guy weekend in the dominican republic. google it. and for the kids we've got the inaugural commemorative radio-controlled drone flyer. now children can fly like an eagle and spy like one, too. and lil drone can also fly into other people's yards and destroy stuff. the insight and analysis. current tv presents the presidential ina
and in many of martin luther king's speeches. people talk about kennedy's inaugural about swords and switchbacks. it's a technique that worked brilliantly for john f. kennedy but i think the president had caught the aura of dr. king today quite well. >> pelley: and this day being inauguration day and martin luther king day all at the same time. doug, thanks very much. cbs news live coverage of the inauguration of president obama will continue from washington in just a moment. [ male announcer ] nearly sixteen million people visit washington dc every year. some come to witness... some to be heard. we come to make an impact. to learn from leaders... and to lead others. to create... and create change. we are the george washington university... we come to make history. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with
't believe that now there's a monument to martin luther king on the mall. and that an african-american president is being -- is being elected and for her, she said the most humble tone, these were dreams that were dangerous to even articulate when i was growing up and now i'm seeing america in that way. this is the beauty of this day. you have the president being inaugurated at a time that coincides with martin luther king's birthday. and it's a good reminder that as tough as things seem, bob, as difficult and challenging of a moment we should in american history, this idea that we are a country that is constantly evolving and changing and the president has a chance to make some incredible history now. immigration reform i think is going to be strong. i think he can find a note of unity on gun safety. here you have a nation where over 80% of gun owners believe in things like universal background checks and closing secondary markets. this gives the president the arc of the moral universe and bending it to justice and showing that this country is strong at the core. >> mr. mayor
daringly, martin luther king jr. was a man of service, and his day should be a day of service. to honor him, let's do the same. go to mlkday.gov and find out how to volunteer on martin luther king day, and beyond. this message is brought to you by the corporation for national and community service. >> the vietnam veterans memorial is one of the most visited sites in washington, d.c., but it's also one of the most controversial. lauren tells us more. >> the vietnam memorial was built to honor the american lives lost during the vietnam war. the war lasted from 1959 to 1975. it was the longest and most unpopular military conflict in u.s. history. troops fought to prevent the northern communists from taking over the south vietnamese government. millions of civilians were killed, as well as over 58,000 american soldiers. like the war itself, the memorial caused controversy. it was designed by maya lin, a young architecture student from yale university. her drawings were selected out of a thousand others in a national design competition. >> maya lin's design was very controversial because, at tha
alone with martin luther king in madrid of all places and the other one is about one of the really terrible servients of th cold war which is when the united states drops four hydrogen bombs on omatiain, lucy unarmed and not on purpose and i will tell you that story, two different stories. before i do that i thought i would tell you about a few other chapters in the book and by the way i brought along a lot of copies, i will write servieryth you write in their. because i'm always looking for readers. that is why you write books. this is my fifteenth book. i write fiction, non-fiction, journalism, i go back and forth. i nservier wanted to make up my mind who wanted to be when i grow up and never have so i go back and forth between this and literary forms. one of the chapterby a couple chapters in the book i might mention and get on to the martin luther king story, one of the chapters is about making the movie doctors of auto, dr. zhit zhivago though marjorie fears his father ran geraldine chaplin his mother and their the picture in the book in the spanish edition and the american po
's actually the 84th anniversary of doctor martin luther king's birth. many people know who doctor king was, a clergyman, activist, husband, father, the most prominent promoter of nonviolence and civil disobedience; he received the nobel peace prize in 1964 in recognition of his nonviolence. only we discussing assault weapons ban ammunitions but acknowledging that today would have been doctor martin luther king's 84th birthday, a very prolific activist. i would like to recognize and former city employee and decorated soldier mr. hillyer terry, born june 4, 1923. while attending college he was drafted to serve in world war ii; he served the united states army from 1943 to 1946 where he received an honorable discharge; he was awarded the american theater campaign medal; the eaim campaign medal with four bronze stars, good combat medal, world war ii victory medal. he was the city and county employee for 33 years and retired as a trusted supervisor for the san francisco municipal transportation agency. he leaves behind a wife as well as his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildre
time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families attended a church service at the episcopal church directly opposite the white house. moments ago the limousine carrying the obamas and the bidens arrived at the capital after the 12 block trip up pennsylvania avenue from the white house. >> joining us, our news hour regular column younist mark shields and new york sometimes columnist mark brooks. >> big day, gwen. it is a big day. it lacks the inherent drama and expense
this president been elected, there is a memorial to dr. martin luther king jr. on the mall. it's not just abraham lincoln or washington or jefferson or roosevelt but also standing nearby martin luther king jr. and it says something for our nation that we're going to create a beloved community, we're going to create a society that is free of racism and bigotry and no one will be left out or left behind. doesn't matter whether you're black or white lashgs tino, asian-american, native american. it doesn't matter where you're straight or gay. dr. king legacy is saying that we are one people, we are one family, we are one house. we make up the american house, the american family. >> amen to that, representative john lewis. thanks for your time. >> thank you. >> in a moment, the big three on how president obama can bridge the political divide in washington. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies
quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare, everyone's saying we have to cut it back. that's the great safety net for the american people. i almost see him as a defender. he has to defend social security and medicare in a fiscally responsible way. >> rose: inaugural day 2013, assessment by journalists and looking forward with historians when we continue. >> rose: today barack obama was sworn in for a second time as president of the united states. it was a cold and sunny day in washington. close to a million people came to the inauguration. they came to celebrate and see history. they included former presidents clinton and carter but not president george w. bush and george h.w. bush his father be
on inauguration day, president obama will take his oath of office on martin luther king's bible. of course, as you mentioned, also the martin luther king holiday and the president taking the oath of office on the other side of the mall where he delivered the "i have a dream" speech and symbolism certainly in that moment. so d.c. getting prepared. i can tell you just because we're not expecting as many people, the hotels here pulling out the stops. i went to one hotel, the jw marriott, they have the executive suites going for $40,000. >> whoa. >> reporter: so just because we're not expecting 1.8 million people doesn't mean it's not a huge celebration here in the city of d.c. toure? >> i hear you're going to all the balls. well played. thank you for that report. >> reporter: thank you. >>> i want to bring in nbc news presidential historian michael beshla. how are you? >> good. thank you. how are you? >> i think we can look at this as the launch and the state of the union sets the tone for what we want to do and the second term to have. what do you think about this inaugural address as this way of so
of the first family to see this service day both to honor the memory of martin luther king junior and as a tradition we hope will live on past the inaugural and move forward regardless of who is in office. then the kids inaugural children's concert a tradition started in 2009 by dr. biden and first lady, michele obama and an extension of their work they have done through their initiative to help honor and support military families. this will take place at the convention center which is also where both balls will take place. we've put on an initial list of talent that will be appearing at both the balls on monday night and the kids concert or one another and as you can imagine this is a logistical list to get a all pieced together as a puzzle and we hope by friday to announce what acts will be appearing in which places. again, this is a great place to honor the sacrifice not just of the men and women that serve every day but of the families that support them. on tuesday, jumping ahead of what we just discussed or past what we just discussed, there will also be the prayer service ta
of martin luther king jr.'s papers. it's part of three days of book tv this weekend. monday, featuring authors and books on the inauguration, president obama, and martin luther king, host: design o'clock a.m. your washington, d.c.. we have and are left to take your calls and continue our discussion -- an hour left to take your calls and continue our discussion. we want to talk about the mental health aspect the president has proposed when it comes to gun control, gun violence. the numbers are on the screen, /political affiliation. you can start dialing in now. we set up our fourth line this morning for mental health professionals. 202-585-3883. we want to hear your experience, your thoughts on this issue. a reminder you can also contact us via social media. we will put up that slate so you can see the different addresses available. the twitter, facebook, an e- mail. this is the president's proposal but he came out -- that he came out yesterday. that #the white house is using for tweets as well, now is the time. it is maybe 20 pages long. it is kind of an executive summary type thing. w
this thy people, that is so great?" [applause] >> and observance of martin luther king holiday this monday, children gathered to read his "i dream -- i have a dream" speech. the children participating or fifth graders from the watkins elementary school in washington, d.c. >> will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. >> i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering in the heat of oppression and injustice will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. >> i have a dream that my children will live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of the skin but by the content of their character. >> i have a dream that one day down in alabama, one day right there in alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and sisters and brothers. >> i have a dream today. >> i have a dream that one day every -- >> the glory of the lord shall be revealed. this is our hope and the faith that we have. this is the hope and the faith to go back to the south with. >> we will be abl
on the inauguration, president obama and martin luther king jr. >> representative mike thompson of california chairs a democratic task force that's examining gun violence. one of the group's public meetings was last week in santa rosa, california and congressman thompson was joined by mental health and education officials. this is a little less than three hours. >> i do have the pleasure of introducing congressman mike thompson. he was first elected to the united states congress in 1998. mike serves on the subcommittee on health and subcommittee on select revenue measures within the committee on ways and means as well as being the ranking member of the subcommittee on terrorism, human intelligence, analysis and counterintelligence and the subcommittee on oversight all within the permanent select committee on intelligence. congressman thompson is a combat veteran. he was a staff sergeant platoon leader in vietnam with the 173rd airborne of the united states army. he also was a purple heart recipient. mike has a reputation for problem solving, for reaching across the aisle. he's been a great asset for
and argument, but activism and blood, and above all, and john atamans to elizabeth cady stanton martin luther king, by a stubborn adherence to the notion that we are all created equal and that we deserve nothing less than a great republic, worthy of our consent. the theme of this year's inaugural is faith in america's future. the perfect embodiment of this unshakable confidence in the ongoing success of our collective journey is in a page from our past. i speak of the improbable completion of the capitol dome and capping it with the statue of freedom which occurred 150 years ago in 1863, when abraham lincoln took office two years earlier, the dome above us was a half built eyesore. conventional wisdom was that it should be left unfinished until the war ended. given the travails and financial needs of the times. but to president lincoln, and have finished dome symbolize that divided nation. lincoln said of people see the capital going on, it is a sign we, the union, shall go on. and so, despite the conflict that engulfed the nation and surrounded the city, the dome continues to rise. on decemb
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)